Government transparency hits new low

Amid Sunshine Week, no less, the Obama administration hit a new low for open government and transparency. On Tuesday, the White House announced its Office of Administration will be considered exempt from complying with Freedom of Information Act requests. The administration says the action reflects a court ruling made before Obama took office in which […]

Drinking problem not moral failing

By Wendel Sloan Local columnist “Mary,” a 50ish High Plains native who is now a businesswoman in a city, recently agreed to discuss her battle with alcoholism. Her first exposure to alcohol was at 5, visiting her grandfather on a West Texas farm while he sipped beer. Her first drink was with 10th-grade friends. By […]

Tourism key to bringing in money

By Robert Arrowsmith Publisher Lately, in an attempt to clear the mind for the night, I have been playing different games on my iPad. Getting involved in enough things and having enough debates, believe it or not, can be tiring. I know I can be strong willed, and I know I can be vocal in […]

Violence only bolsters resolve, solves nothing

It was disheartening — and a little frightening — to hear about an apparent arson on March 7 at the Rio Grande SUN, an Espanola newspaper that more than once has been the target of unhappy readers (or story subjects) for its no-holds-barred brand of community journalism. Now, let’s be clear: Any act of arson […]

Being prepared is common sense

By Kent McManigal Local columnist The water outage in Portales last week should have awakened a few people. From previous experience, I doubt it did. For years, I have advocated preparing for possible problems. No, I’m not a “doomsday prepper” waiting for a magnetic pole shift, the collapse of civilization, or a solar flare burning […]

Categorizing people should stop

By Rube Render Local columnist Many conservatives in this country believe the political left has hi-jacked our education system, particularly when it comes to higher education. As evidence of this belief, they list Bill Ayers, retired from the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, formerly holding the titles of distinguished professor […]

Even regents’ seats are now contentious

Even learning is political these days. Remember when members of a university’s board of regents were supposed to approve budgets, hire (and fire) university presidents and lobby lawmakers and private donors for money? Remember when the people appointed to those jobs were supposed to maybe know a little something about education, or know about managing […]

Youths key to rural town survival

By Tom McDonald State columnist There’s a man running around, talking about small towns and whether or not they have a future. Earlier this month, he visited Raton. Given the topic, I’ll bet he gets a lot of speaking engagements. Raton is just one of thousands of small towns that are struggling, as urbanization builds […]

Family of child deserves peace after 10 years

The most heinous crime in Clovis’ history is debatable. But a schoolboy spat that ended with an innocent, sleeping child shot in the head will always be in that conversation. Almost 10 years after 10-year-old Carlos Perez was killed in his home near Dennis Chavez Park, the last of his four accused killers was convicted […]

Negative feedback most entertaining

By Wendel Sloan Local columnist Last week, I was in Dallas for a routine medical appointment, so for my fifth anniversary of pecking out this column (with three or four fingers) I’m letting readers do the heavy lifting by sharing a sampling of feedback. Positive comments far outweigh the negative, but the hostile ones are […]

Many little things become big deal

By Robert Arrowsmith Publisher In Portales Leadership class, we had a number put to us that opened some eyes. Randy Knudson, from the economic development organization, stated that the aquifer beneath Portales has about 13 years of life left in it based on current demands. Thirteen years. During our class discussion, questions and ideas came […]

Life goes on despite worldly ‘troubles’

There was interesting news on the Albuquerque TV station on March 1. It was in reference to a letter sent to the Clovis News Journal concerning the paper’s Valentine’s Day (front page) article. Apparently it glorified the romance of two men, as it was presented. I didn’t see the article but feel obligated to make […]

Letter to the Editor: Bring ‘three Rs’ back to schools

Regarding recent reports in the Clovis News Journal: • Keith Ingram wrote about standardized school testing and I fully agree with his questions about the reason for and to what end. The students are passing the tests, making the teachers and school look good, and going out the door with zero to enter the word […]

GOP should sign on with updated Voting Rights Act

For anyone who believes protests don’t matter, the 50th anniversary of the March on Selma across the Edmund Pettus Bridge is a reminder how powerful the voice of the people can be when citizens join to fight injustice. Because of civil rights protests, both in Alabama and across the country, the nation passed the Voting […]

Lawmakers much like rabid hyenas

By Kent McManigal Local columnist Why does so much news revolve around the individuals who call themselves government? It’s because they impose themselves in our lives. They make it necessary to know, in self defense, what they are up to. Through their actions they are a real and present danger to your life, liberty, pursuit […]

Email scandal won’t stop Hillary

By Rube Render Local columnist The list of embarrassing incidents he learned about from news reports grew by one when President Barack Obama told CBS News correspondent Bill Plante on Saturday that he found out about the Hillary Clinton email situation that way. Several days later, White House Press Secretary Josh Ernest was forced to […]

Time government left us, time alone

We may never get back that hour of sleep we lost over the weekend to usher in daylight saving time if a bill making its way through the New Mexico legislative process is approved. It will be a small sacrifice, however, if it means we don’t have to flip-flop our clocks twice a year for […]

Papers public interest watchdogs

By Tom McDonald State columnist One of my old journalism school textbooks lays out seven “elements of news” that are worth reviewing from time to time. They are: timeliness, conflict, human interest, impact, prominence, proximity and unusualness — news elements that help newspaper editors decide what’s news and what’s not, and what should go on […]

ISC transparency bill deserves serious thought

Several lawmakers want to rein in the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, which has been a lightning rod over a controversial multimillion dollar plan it approved to divert water from the Gila River. The project has spawned a tug of war between environmentalists and others who fear the river and its wildlife will be harmed, […]

Speech impediment a dream killer

By Wendel Sloan Local columnist Understandably, the subject of today’s column requested anonymity. I will call him “Frustrated.” The High Plains resident said in his 50-plus years he has confided his secret to only a handful of trusted friends (finally including me). Since childhood, he has coped with a speech impediment — enduring ridicule from […]