Resale stores fuel charities

By Emily Crowe

ecrowe@cnjonline.com

Disabled veteran Rick Hudson and his daughter Amber are working on fixing up his home, and managed to find a few affordable items at a resale shop in Clovis.

Local branches of Habitat for Humanity and Goodwill have stores outfitted with gently used goods available at low prices to the public, and all proceeds go directly back to the organizations’ people and programs.

The Habitat for Humanity ReStore sells building materials and household goods ranging from picture frames and televisions to toilets and sinks, all donated by local business and individuals.

That’s where the Hudsons found a light fixture to help with their home improvements.

“I’m just looking to see what I might use,” Rick Hudson said, “and I’ve got someone else’s house in mind also.”

CMI staff photo: Emily Crowe Amber Hudson and her father Rick shop for light fixtures at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore in Clovis.

CMI staff photo: Emily Crowe
Amber Hudson and her father Rick shop for light fixtures at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore in Clovis.

After five years in Portales, the shop recently relocated to Gidding Street in Clovis. Habitat for Humanity Office Manager Marge Rhode said the new site offers proper heating and cooling, as well as other utilities.

“We get a number of pieces of artwork for the wall and knick knacks,” Rhode said of the goods available at the store. “We have some dishes and we have musical instruments. We also get donations from contractors who have overages on materials they’ve purchased.”

All of the proceeds from sales go toward Habitat’s general operating fund, which pays for staff, gas for the donation truck and building utilities, among other operating costs.

According to Rhode, the organization has built seven houses in Portales and five houses in Clovis for families in need since 2001.

“We’re hoping someday the ReStore will be able to generate enough sales to sponsor a house,” she said.

Goodwill, another local mainstay, also offers shoppers gently used goods, including clothing, household items and holiday decor, with all proceeds going toward programs in the region.

Melissa Perez, community relations coordinator for Goodwill Industries of New Mexico, said money generated by the thrift store in Clovis goes into programs and services including skills training, job development and social services.

Goodwill programs available free of charge in Curry and Roosevelt counties include supportive services for veteran families, brain injury case management and the senior community service employment program.

“We’re always striving to get bigger and better,” Perez said. “We are very proud to say 92 cents of every dollar spent at Goodwill goes into our programs and services.”