Obama appears willing to risk party for plan

Freedom New Mexico

President Barack Obama and the congressional Democratic leadership seem determined to engage in a high-wire act without a net.

It might be possible to admire them for their courage in the face of the unpopularity of their cause, and there is no shortage of cheerleaders in the hothouse of Babylon-on-the-Potomac. But it is likely their contempt for public opinion will backfire on them.

In his terse White House speech followed by no question period Wednesday, the president made it clear that, despite popular opinion and numerous procedural difficulties ahead, he intends to orchestrate a no-holds-barred campaign to get “a final vote on health care reform” before the Easter recess in a few weeks.

Although he avoided the dread word “reconciliation,” a controversial and divisive procedure to get around a Senate filibuster, it’s clear that’s how he intends to proceed.

Although the Democrats hold solid majorities in both the House and the Senate, the president is still having problems finding a majority in his own party.

The reasons are simple. The Pollster.com cumulative rating from all national polls has shown a majority of Americans opposed to the health care plans on offer that has held since July.

Massachusetts —Massachusetts! — elected a Republican senator largely on the strength of opposition to Obamacare.