5/18 BRAC letters to the editor

Community can still save Cannon
I was one of the first 150 military personnel who arrived at Clovis Army Air Field back in 1942. At that time there were no buildings on the base and the runway was being reconstructed.

For the first six months after the base opened, the 150 men were housed in the Clovis community, I, myself, and one other soldier lived with the Schwartz family at 801 Connally. During this tenure the Cannon personnel received wonderful support from the surrounding community.

Considering the wonderful community support that still exists, the costly investment of major facilities now existing on the base, the nearby bombing range, efforts to expand the supersonic airspace and the excellent flying weather we have for training pilots, it is difficult to understand why the Department of Defense chose to target Cannon for closure, while retaining other bases where congested and excessive commercial aircraft traffic exists.

I believe there is a good chance this proposal to close Cannon can be blocked. Our people must make their views known.

Len Santi
Clovis

Government benefits if Cannon stays put
The BRAC Commission needs to know every way that it will save the government money to keep Cannon Air Force Base in place.

Here are some money issues to consider:

Cost of living allowances are not as high in eastern New Mexico as where they plan to move the base.

Cannon has an updated new runway; sending planes to another location would waste that asset and accelerate wear on others that may not be as up to date.

Everyone can think of ways the government can benefit by keeping Cannon.

Why not have a special column in the News Journal for all ideas to be listed?

Anne M. Locke
Clovis

Cannon closing could be blessing
When we first came to Clovis in 1983, the town seemed to be sleepy, without zip and had a “can’t-do” attitude.
But that attitude has since changed.

Now, instead of a “can’t-do” attitude from City Hall, we hear “What can we do to make this work?”

And I believe that nothing will phase Clovis, including the closing of Cannon. Instead of a doom-and-gloom attitude, the attitude will be how this closing of Cannon can become a real plus — what an ideal location for a major plant or other terrific installation that would hire on a long-term basis at much greater potential than a military installation.

Now is the time for Clovis leaders to work hard to change this glitch from a short-term setback into a long-term windfall and keep moving forward with a positive “can do” attitude.

Bill Giese
Clovis